Results tagged ‘ Hall of Fame ’

‘Sir, I’m Canadian. I can’t fight in your army.’

Many professional baseball players have been immersed in the game since they were born. Maybe their father played pro ball, or they grew up in a baseball-crazy town in a warm-weather climate, where neighbors and older friends and community idols were drafted, paving a clear path to follow.

Stubby Clapp was not one of those players. A native of Windsor, Ontario, he grew up surrounded by hockey rinks and played on ice as well as diamonds until he was a teenager. The ValleyCats manager, telling his story to the Frank and Peggy Steele Interns from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum when they came to visit “The Joe” on Saturday, had to choose between baseball and hockey and, he said, “Baseball chose me. It paid for my education at the time, it gave me a better scholarship than hockey could offer at the time – I’m not very big, even on skates – and baseball gave me a life I could never replace.”

Stubby, who took his first trip to the Hall on an off day in early July, said he initially had no idea that he might be able to play professionally. “My whole goal in life was to be a doctor. When I went south, I figured if someone was going to pay for my education [with a scholarship], then I was going to be a doctor.”

The idea of pro ball was so foreign to Stubby that he had no idea that there was an MLB Draft until shortly before he was selected in 1996.

“My junior year at Texas Tech, I got called into the office with my coaches,” he said. He figured he must have been in trouble for something, but he couldn’t think of a reason – he was “pretty square then,” he says – so he couldn’t figure out a reason for the meeting.

“Larry Hays, who was our coach at the time, says, ‘If you get drafted, will you go?’ And he had me stumped, and I just looked him square in the eyes, and said, ‘Sir, I’m Canadian. I can’t fight in your army.’ True story, I had no idea what the major league draft was.”

Stubby, still stunned by the news, took some time to think about it and chose baseball – and he’s very glad that he did.

“I’ve seen the world for free through baseball,” he said, referencing his professional travels through America as well as his international stints with the Canadian national team. “I’m thinking about Beijing right now, and the amount of help that went into putting on that Olympics [in 2008] was unbelievable. I didn’t touch a door in Beijing – there was somebody at every single door of every venue that you went through, to open it and greet you.”

Watch Stubby’s full speech:

Kevin Whitaker

Hall of Fame Night

Saturday was Hall of Fame Night at “The Joe,” as some special guests joined us from Cooperstown. The Frank and Peggy Steele Interns from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum visited the ballpark and enjoyed a pre-game presentation that featured ‘Cats president Bill Gladstone, vice president/general manager Rick Murphy and field manager Stubby Clapp.
 
The Hall of Fame display on the concourse included some great game-used artifacts such as Derek Jeter’s bat, Pedro Martinez jersey, and Craig Biggio’s batting gloves. The items that were closest to home were a glove and cleats used by Troy native Johnny Evers. It was amazing to see how much the equipment has changed since the early 1900’s.
 
Best Fire was the game sponsor and set-up a patio display on the concourse. Those seats looked great by the Hot Corner and would probably be even better in someone’s backyard.
 
The Exxon Mobile Tour was also in the house again with giveaways, prizes and the Dizzy Dipstick race.
 
Our friends John and Regina Cole from Cole’s Collision Centers were good-natured participants in the “Know Your Partner” game between innings.
 
Despite eleven hits by the offense and a solid start from Nick Tropeano, the ‘Cats dropped a tough 4-3 decision. They will be back at it on Sunday for game two against the Auburn Doubledays. MVP Health Care presents another Sunday Funday as we pay tribute to the men and women who keep the Capital Region and beyond safe with Community Heroes Night.

Brandon Meredith slides into second with a stolen base in the second inning.

Nick Tropeano battled through five innings, allowing two runs and striking out six batters.

Photos taken by Garrett Craig. For more pictures from every ValleyCats event, visit our Seton Health ‘Cats Camera page.

Hall of Fame Field Trip

Many of the ValleyCats interns and front office members took a field trip to Cooperstown yesterday to visit the birthplace of baseball. As lifelong fans, most of us had visited the Baseball Hall of Fame one or two or twenty times before, but that did not make the trip any less special.

We carpooled down I-88, entered the Hall of Fame and started the day in the “Bullpen Theatre.” Brad Horn, the Hall’s senior director of communications and education, greeted us and briefly introduced the museum’s mission. Horn talked about how the minor leagues – especially short-season teams – and the Hall can bookend a player’s professional lifetime: all players start their careers in the minors, the best of those reach the majors, and the top 1 percent of that group will be great enough to end up in the Hall of Fame.

He also brought along All-Star Game MVP Prince Fielder’s jersey, which he had received from Fielder immediately after the Midsummer Classic two days earlier. A small dirt stain was still visible on the lower back, showing how the jersey was, as Horn said, a representation of that moment in time.

For the past two years (ever since the formerly-Oneonta Tigers moved to Connecticut), the ValleyCats have been the closest minor-league team to Cooperstown, and we have enjoyed a very strong partnership with the Baseball Hall of Fame. We got to meet and mingle with the Hall’s interns, who have recently been very busy preparing for next week’s induction ceremony, in which Roberto Alomar, Bert Blyleven and Pat Gillick will be enshrined in the Hall.

The Hall’s team of interns will come up to Joe Bruno Stadium on July 30 for Hall of Fame Night, a chance to watch some great baseball. They will also show off some historical artifacts with a Capital Region flavor, which we had a chance to see:

A glove and cleats used by Troy native and Hall of Famer Johnny Evers, who was immortalized in one of baseball’s two most famous poems, “Baseball’s Sad Lexicon.”

Derek Jeter’s Louisville Slugger-model bat from the 2000 All-Star Game. Jeter would become the only player ever to be named the MVP of the All-Star Game and the World Series in the same year.

Chris Chenes, who has a knack for appearing in our pictures, talks alongside Pedro Martinez’s 1999 All-Star Game jersey. Pedro was named the game’s MVP for striking out five of the game’s best players in two scoreless innings.

Afterward, we were able to explore the museum. We got to see some new exhibits alongside the old standbys, including the most famous area of all, the Hall of Fame itself:

‘Cats broadcaster Erik Elken listens to an exhibit featuring some famed radio voices from the past.

Afterwards, we took in the beautiful blocks surrounding the Hall and browsed some of the local shops. One store carried a wealth of Minor League Baseball hats, including a 2010 championship model of the red ValleyCats hat. The shopkeeper was probably surprised to see 13 people enter the store, rush over and excitedly point at it.

If any of our Tri-City followers (or baseball fans from anywhere in the country) have not visited the Hall of Fame, we strongly encourage you to make a trip down to Cooperstown – it’s well worth the drive. And come to “The Joe” for Hall of Fame Night on July 30!

Kevin Whitaker

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